We all ride alone

Motorists and cyclists not only share the road but also the rules.

The perceptive Pastor sure made a point about cycling in a nicely expressed sentiment (‘How cycling is like faith’, Sept. 26 edition).

Reverend Spencer wrote about what a lot of us ‘born again bicyclists’ are experiencing — a return to the pleasures of a bicycle ride for recreation, fitness, transportation and to lessen our collective carbon footprint.

Once the crank was added in the 1860’s, the bicycle was the fastest machine on earth and presently there are over one billion bicycles on our planet with some 130 million manufactured annually.

As Spencer mentions, motorists and cyclists not only share the road but also the rules.

So, as I consider myself one of the ‘two wheeled congregation’ and also a board member with the Oceanside Cycling Coalition (.ca), I cheerfully submit the distilled wisdom of cycling survival:

•  ensure your bicycle is in good working order.

• let your local bike shop get to know you.

•  obey the rules of the road.  Know the ‘Motor Vehicle Act’ and  get a copy of “Bike Sense” or go online: www.bikesense.bc.ca.

• be safe, be seen, be skilled, be courteous: take a course, such as with the Can Bike Program (Transport Canada).

•  enjoy all the health/social/financial benefits of riding a bicycle…join a group (like PGOSA).

•  become an advocate to help create positive change, join the www.oceansidecyclingcoalition.ca.

And yes, we must possess faith in other users of the road, our own abilities and the reliability of our bikes in order to keep moving forward.

Remember, even in a group, you still ride alone. As for close calls, fervent prayer is needed!

One more thing in response to the recent letter to the editor (‘Speed rise applause’, Sept. 26).  I must state that in some savvy jurisdictions, cyclists are not required to come to a complete stop at stop signs if safe to do so.

Happy and safe riding to everyone.

Gord Byers

 

Parksville