Your help is needed on invasive species

Thank-you for the very informative article about invasive species. It’s a serious problem, as the article indicated.

Thank-you for the very informative article about invasive species (The NEWS, Dec. 10). It’s a serious problem, as the article indicated. Invasive species are the second greatest threat to Earth’s ecosystems, only second to development.

According to the Save the Frogs Foundation, bullfrogs have already driven 100 frog species to complete extinction.

We can’t blame Scotch broom on the Scots, English Ivy on the English, or Japanese knotweed on the Japanese.  It is the individuals who foolishly or naively brought these damaging invasive species here that are responsible.

But now, invasive species are a serious responsibility for everyone, especially government and landowners. Parksville and Nanaimo have complaint-driven bylaws that require landowners to remove certain invasive plants, like Scotch broom, from their property. The UK takes it a step further.

In the UK, individuals who ignore orders to control Japanese knotweed will have committed a criminal offence and can be fined up to £2,500. A criminal offence. Giant hogweed (also here locally) is included in the UK’s new law.

Scotch broom is our most familiar invasive plant. Dense broom used to line Village Way, Rupert and Memorial Road in Qualicum Beach. You don’t see much broom in town now, thanks to Broombuster volunteers who have been eradicating it here since 2006. In fact, please join the volunteers in April and May. Broom cut in bloom will die (see www.broombusters.org).

Broom invades natural areas with dire and dangerous consequences. Broom prevents reforestation and can ruin farmland, parks and green spaces with prolific seeds viable for over 30 years.

Last summer, BC Wildfire Service pointed to increased wildfire danger from broom and gorse on their website (www.bcwildfire.ca). Both plants are extremely flammable, with very high oil content and many dead branches. To let it run rampant under B.C. Hydro power lines is just asking for disaster.

Invasive species are a problem almost anyone can take action on, and the sooner the better. Your help is needed.

Joanne Sales, BroombustersInvasive Plant SocietyQualicum Beach

Just Posted

Thirty trees destroyed in Parksville’s Cedar Ridge Estates

Damage estimated at $30K; city says vandals intended to permanently ruin the trees

City of Parksville buys 222 Corfield site, now sole owners

With the purchase, the city will not facilitate cold weather shelter, soup kitchen on property

Canadian Music Hall of Famer Steven Page to play Parksville

Barenaked Ladies co-founder performs at Knox United Church on June 1

Parksville Beach Festival Society launches campaign for outdoor stage

Public invited to event May 25 to help with kickoff

Killer of Calgary mother, daughter gets no parole for 50 years

A jury found Edward Downey guilty last year in the deaths of Sara Baillie, 34, and five-year-old Taliyah Marsman

So, do you know ‘Dave from Vancouver Island’?

Ontario man searching for fellow he travelled with in Europe 50 years ago

Raptors beat Bucks 120-102 to even series at 2-2

Lowry pours in 25 as Toronto moves within two games of NBA Finals

Body of missing snowmobiler recovered from Great Slave Lake

Police confirm the body is that of one of three missing snowmobilers

Christmas morning burglar sentenced on Vancouver Island

Justin Redmond Feusse, 20, sentenced to 240 days in jail for Dec. 25 break-and-enter

Toddler seriously injured after falling from Okanagan balcony

RCMP are investigating after a two-year-old boy fell from the balcony of an apartment in Kelowna

Cost jumps 35% for Trans-Canada Highway widening in B.C.

Revelstoke-area stretch first awarded under new union deal

Is vegan food a human right? Ontario firefighter battling B.C. blaze argues it is

Adam Knauff says he had to go hungry some days because there was no vegan food

Winds helping in battle against fire threatening northern Alberta town

Nearly 5,000 people have cleared out of High Level and nearby First Nation

Most Read