Climate change

Michael Yellowlees and his Alaskan Husky, Luna, are embarking on another cross-Canada trip—this time in a car—to revisit places they walked in 2021. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Kilted Scotsman, dog retrace steps across Canada, reinforcing climate change message

Michael Yellowlees starts second cross-country tour with a July 3 gig on Vancouver Island

 

Leanne Opuyes uses a spray bottle to mist her face while cooling off in the frigid Lynn Creek water in North Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, June 28, 2021. Heat warnings and special weather statements cover much of Yukon from the northwest to the southeast and Environment Canada says residents in the territory can’t expect much relief until at least mid-week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Unseasonable heat prompts warnings, adds to growing wildfire risk in Yukon

About 6,000 lightning strikes are peppering the territory daily

 

People fuel up vehicles at a Shell gas station after the price of a litre of regular grade gasoline reached a new high of $2.28, in Vancouver, on Saturday, May 14, 2022. Canada’s new emissions standards for gasoline and diesel will allow oil companies that get a federal tax break for installing carbon capture and storage systems to generate credits based on those systems, which they can then sell to refineries and fuel importers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada to allow companies to get tax credits and sell carbon credits

Cabinet approved the final regulations for the Clean Fuel Standard last week

 

Burned trees are seen in the aftermath of the July 2021 White Rock Lake wildfire, in this aerial view southeast of Kamloops, British Columbia, on Thursday, August 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. scientists see recovery but fear more heat domes could change ecosystems forever

Cold-water marine species could be replaced by warm-water organisms, triggering cascading effects

Burned trees are seen in the aftermath of the July 2021 White Rock Lake wildfire, in this aerial view southeast of Kamloops, British Columbia, on Thursday, August 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A young boy is silhouetted as he jumps off the pier at Crescent Beach into Boundary Bay, in Surrey, B.C., Tuesday, July 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

A timeline of B.C.’s record-setting extreme heat event in June 2021

Environment Canada heat warnings covered most of British Columbia one year ago…

A young boy is silhouetted as he jumps off the pier at Crescent Beach into Boundary Bay, in Surrey, B.C., Tuesday, July 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Susie Rieder, a spokeswoman for BC Hydro, who uses a heat pump to heat and cool her Burnaby, B.C. home, is shown in a handout photo.THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Susie Rieder

Heat pump might help B.C. residents save utility costs, but do your research first

Unit can eliminate need for air conditioner, reduce your household’s environmental footprint

Susie Rieder, a spokeswoman for BC Hydro, who uses a heat pump to heat and cool her Burnaby, B.C. home, is shown in a handout photo.THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Susie Rieder
Fish fragments unearthed from the villages of Ts’ishaa and Huu7ii in Barkley Sound, B.C. (Dylan Hillis/University of Victoria)

Ancient Vancouver Island fish bones may hold lessons for adapting to climate change

5,000-year-old bones show how Indigenous people worked with warming oceans

  • Jun 22, 2022
Fish fragments unearthed from the villages of Ts’ishaa and Huu7ii in Barkley Sound, B.C. (Dylan Hillis/University of Victoria)
B.C. Environment and Climate Change Strategy Minister George Heyman speaks during an announcement at Burns Bog, in Delta, B.C., on Monday, June 29, 2020.The British Columbia government has released its new strategy to get the province ready to fight extreme weather. Heyman says the plan includes enhanced roles for the BC Wildfire Service to prepare and prevent fires. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. urges preparedness and strategy to fight extreme climate events

Communities urged to take steps to minimize the potential damage

B.C. Environment and Climate Change Strategy Minister George Heyman speaks during an announcement at Burns Bog, in Delta, B.C., on Monday, June 29, 2020.The British Columbia government has released its new strategy to get the province ready to fight extreme weather. Heyman says the plan includes enhanced roles for the BC Wildfire Service to prepare and prevent fires. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Two Save Old Growth protesters blocking Highway 1 at the Columbia River Bridge in Revelstoke. The group’s co-founder Zain Haq says he’s gone into hiding out of fear of deportation. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)

Save Old Growth organizer fears his climate activism has made him a target for deportation

Zain Haq, who is in Canada on a study permit, says he’s gone into hiding

  • Jun 20, 2022
Two Save Old Growth protesters blocking Highway 1 at the Columbia River Bridge in Revelstoke. The group’s co-founder Zain Haq says he’s gone into hiding out of fear of deportation. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)
Save Old Growth demonstrators blocked the northbound Pat Bay Highway early in the morning on June 13. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth/Twitter)

Save Old Growth protester shatters hip during B.C. highway blockade

Campaigners say they will continue actions until old growth logging is halted in B.C.

Save Old Growth demonstrators blocked the northbound Pat Bay Highway early in the morning on June 13. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth/Twitter)
A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)

B.C. estuary a showcase for the reclamation of ruined habitat

Sterile former industrial wasteland in Campbell River e being restored as prime fish habitat

A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)
Data collected via LEO satellites is being used for earth surface GHG surveillance by a B.C. firm. (pixabay photo)

B.C. space-tech exposing greenhouse gas emissions to better combat climate change

Vancouver’s Metaspectral gets $150,000 from the The Canadian Space Agency to analyze satellite data

Data collected via LEO satellites is being used for earth surface GHG surveillance by a B.C. firm. (pixabay photo)
Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

VIDEO: Vancouver rooftops home to a new breed of honey bee: one made to survive

Ensure Hive Future breeding queen bees to be resistant to deadly mites

Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
The members of the Fridays for the Future group from Kwalikum Secondary School in 2019 went out to the community to raise awareness about climate change. (PQB News file photo)

‘Fridays for the Future’ group makes good impression on Qualicum Beach council

Kwalikum students to be part of town’s discussion on climate change

The members of the Fridays for the Future group from Kwalikum Secondary School in 2019 went out to the community to raise awareness about climate change. (PQB News file photo)
Photo depicting ocean warming and temperature change patterns. (Government of Canada)

Federal report shows the impact of warming oceans on B.C. coast

2021 Pacific Ocean report details climate change impacts and conservation goals

Photo depicting ocean warming and temperature change patterns. (Government of Canada)
B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Review into B.C.’s 2021 heat dome deaths finds 93% didn’t have air conditioning

Cooling requirements in new builds among recommendations by BC Coroners Service’s report

B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
In this March 24, 2017 photo, a tick is displayed in Plainville, Mass. The prevalence of tiny crawling bugs that can carry Lyme disease is higher than ever in most of Canada this year, a leading tick researcher says, with the most ticks found in Ontario and Nova Scotia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Connors/The Sun Chronicle via AP

Experts expect bad year for ticks as disease-carrying bugs expand range in Canada

Researcher says climate change means each tick season will likely be worse than the last

In this March 24, 2017 photo, a tick is displayed in Plainville, Mass. The prevalence of tiny crawling bugs that can carry Lyme disease is higher than ever in most of Canada this year, a leading tick researcher says, with the most ticks found in Ontario and Nova Scotia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Connors/The Sun Chronicle via AP
A drop of maple water drips out of a spile from a tree that was just tapped at the Vanier Museopark sugar bush in Ottawa on Saturday, March 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Maple syrup producers see climate change as a threat to industry’s future

Syrup producers are recording declining yields due to increasing global temperatures

A drop of maple water drips out of a spile from a tree that was just tapped at the Vanier Museopark sugar bush in Ottawa on Saturday, March 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

B.C. communities to receive new annual climate action funding

Each to recieve at least $38,000 annually for next 3 years

The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)
Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio

Residents who fled flooded N.W.T town can return; some services might be unavailable

Hay River is an important transportation and communications centre

Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio