Environment

FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)

Chances of climate catastrophe are ignored, scientists say

“I do not believe civilization as we know it will make it out of this century”: B.C. scientist

FILE - Climate activists Elizabeth Wathuti of Kenia, Vanessa Nakate of Uganda and Helena Gualinga of Ecuador attend the climate protest alongside the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 26, 2022. A group of top climate scientists say the world needs to think about the ultimate climate catastrophe, human extinction, and how possible it is. They are calling on the world’s main climate science body to look at the ultimate climate catastrophes, no matter how remotely unlikely they are. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
An Oak Bay Police Department (OBPD) car parked outside the office on Monterey Avenue. (Black Press Media file photo)

Tyre Extinguishers: Environmental activists deflate tires on 34 SUVs in Greater Victoria

The group, called Tyre Extinguishers, wants to eliminate SUVs in cities

An Oak Bay Police Department (OBPD) car parked outside the office on Monterey Avenue. (Black Press Media file photo)
Don Allingham talks to Jeff Moore about some of the flood mapping findings. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Mapping of Island river’s floodplain to aid in future flooding risks

Magnitude and complexity of the problem clear, but there’s no quick and easy solution

Don Allingham talks to Jeff Moore about some of the flood mapping findings. (Photo by Don Bodger)
As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).

Plastic predicament: Federal group urges action on packaging legislation in Canada

Oceana Canada is calling on the government to reduce the amount of harmful single-use plastics

As plastic continues to pollute the ocean, Oceana Canada is calling on the government action (credit Oceana Canada/Elemental).
Nanoose Bay photographer Deborah Freeman’s work is on display as part of an ecologically-themed exhibition at the McMillan Arts Centre (MAC) in Parksville. (Kevin Forsyth photo)
Nanoose Bay photographer Deborah Freeman’s work is on display as part of an ecologically-themed exhibition at the McMillan Arts Centre (MAC) in Parksville. (Kevin Forsyth photo)
FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

Alaska experiencing wildfires it’s never seen before

530 wildfires already recorded this year, worst of season yet to come

FILE - Wildfires burning hundreds of miles away create smoky conditions Monday, June 13, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska’s remarkable wildfire season includes over 530 blazes that have burned an area more than three times the size of Rhode Island, with nearly all the impacts, including dangerous breathing conditions from smoke, attributed to fires started by lightning. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Landfills and climate change increasing polar bear-human conflicts in Arctic: report

Climate change diminishing food supply for bears, while making the Arctic more hospitable for humans

A polar bear is seen walking along the road in Churchill, Man. Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Climate change and human impacts on the land are behind a growing number of encounters between people and polar bears around the Arctic, new research concludes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Dave Bedard & Sons Contracting helped out with a bobcat and excavator, along with the services of a skilled operator. (Submitted photo)

Volunteers remove 12.6 tons of garbage near Qualicum fish hatchery

Community groups spent three days between April and July

Dave Bedard & Sons Contracting helped out with a bobcat and excavator, along with the services of a skilled operator. (Submitted photo)
Burnaby vet technician Jocelyn Marsh shows off part of her pill bottle return program. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

B.C. veterinarian has plan to eliminate millions of pieces of plastic from Canadian clinics

Very simple changes can have a large impact if adopted broadly, Jocelyn Marsh says

Burnaby vet technician Jocelyn Marsh shows off part of her pill bottle return program. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
The caterpillar of a spongy (formerly gypsy) moth is distinctive, and microscopic at the start of its life. (Courtesy Davey Tree)

These 3 pests with rising populations can decimate Vancouver Island foliage

The spongy moth is dangerous as ever despite government intervention

The caterpillar of a spongy (formerly gypsy) moth is distinctive, and microscopic at the start of its life. (Courtesy Davey Tree)
Parksville residents, the city and local organizations recently teamed up to remove approximately 90 bags of an invasive plant species, known as lamium, from Shelly Creek Park over four days in late June. (City of Parksville photo)
Parksville residents, the city and local organizations recently teamed up to remove approximately 90 bags of an invasive plant species, known as lamium, from Shelly Creek Park over four days in late June. (City of Parksville photo)
Photos depicting a 2021 update on trail construction in the Parksville Wetlands area. (Submitted photo)

Parksville will use $127K in grant money for wetlands remediation efforts

Studies needed to determine health of wetlands, according to director of operations

Photos depicting a 2021 update on trail construction in the Parksville Wetlands area. (Submitted photo)
A colder, wetter spring may not necessarily mean an influx of mosquitoes in Nanaimo and elsewhere in B.C., says an entomologist at the University of B.C. (Stock photo)

Colder spring may not mean population boom for Vancouver Island mosquitoes

Entomologist discusses weather’s effects on the irritating insect

A colder, wetter spring may not necessarily mean an influx of mosquitoes in Nanaimo and elsewhere in B.C., says an entomologist at the University of B.C. (Stock photo)
The Canadian Coast Guard ship called John P. Tully has been used to bring scientists to the Explorer Seamount — Canada’s largest underwater mountain. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

West Coast expedition off B.C. explores never-before-seen deep-sea habitat

‘We are going to habitats that nobody’s mapped before, that nobody’s seen before’

The Canadian Coast Guard ship called John P. Tully has been used to bring scientists to the Explorer Seamount — Canada’s largest underwater mountain. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)
The move to ban single-use plastics will prevent 33 billion units of forks, bags, six-pack rings and other plastics from landfills. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Single-use plastic ban a ‘monumental’ step in protecting Canada’s oceans: advocate

Canada is planning phased-in ban on the manufacture, import, sale and export of plastics

The move to ban single-use plastics will prevent 33 billion units of forks, bags, six-pack rings and other plastics from landfills. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)
A northern red-legged frog pictured in 2020. (Photo/Robin Doty Blymyer)

Nature Trust of B.C. protecting nearly 150 acres of rare Gulf Island climate zone

143.5-acres purchase aims to protect endangered species in new conservation zone on Saturna Island

A northern red-legged frog pictured in 2020. (Photo/Robin Doty Blymyer)
Two Save Old Growth protesters blocking Highway 1 at the Columbia River Bridge in Revelstoke. The group’s co-founder Zain Haq says he’s gone into hiding out of fear of deportation. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)

Save Old Growth organizer fears his climate activism has made him a target for deportation

Zain Haq, who is in Canada on a study permit, says he’s gone into hiding

  • Jun 20, 2022
Two Save Old Growth protesters blocking Highway 1 at the Columbia River Bridge in Revelstoke. The group’s co-founder Zain Haq says he’s gone into hiding out of fear of deportation. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)