Editorial: We should be able to help everyone

In our Dec. 4 issue, we detailed the efforts of a Qualicum Beach woman looking for help bringing Syrian family of seven to Canada.

Jada Morgan wants to quickly form a volunteer group to help the family to the Island.

In July, Morgan said she was struck with an intense desire to “help the children of Lebanon” and so set off on a three-month trip to the Middle Eastern country.

Morgan, a retired social worker, rented an apartment in Beirut and quickly became close to neighbouring children and their families, teaching them numbers, buying them toys and even starting night classes. One family in particular caught her attention, Syrian refugees whose home was detroyed. She said the children in the family are between the ages of four and 15 and all are generous and hard-working people. She wants them to have a new life in Canada.

Interestingly, the reaction to the story was overwhelmingly slanted in one direction — we should be helping ‘our own’ first.

A sample of the reaction online:

“Charity starts at home. Help our homeless first.”

“We should be helping our own before bringing more people into Canada that taxpayers are ultimately responsible for.”

“It’s a very nice thought, but there are so many Canadian families that need help first! Our own people are suffering but we wanna bring more people in from other places to help them? If we can’t help the people who already live here how can we be expected to help outsiders?”

“Help some of the people that visit the soup kitchen in Parksville every week.”

And on and on.

Of course, the internet being the cesspool that it can be, with anonymous bravado ruling the roost, there were far worse comments.

The obvious question: Who says we can’t help as many people as possible?

One woman in Qualicum Beach who chooses to volunteer her time and effort helping Syrian refugees isn’t hampering the efforts back home.

We love the spirit behind the pleas to help those close to home. We agree the less-fortunate around here need more help.

But if you’re going to complain mightily about bringing in a family, we sure hope you’re out there doing what you can for everyone locally that requires assistance.

How many of those commenting are volunteers themselves? Probably more than a few, which is heartening. We sincerely applaud their effotts to better our community.

But for those blowhards who want to moan about how someone chooses to spend their time helping others – and aren’t doing anything themselves – your complaints ring hollow. Might we suggest a visit to https://www.oceansidevolunteer.org/ or a call to the Oceanside Volunteer Association at 250-594-2637.

If you want to make a difference, it does indeed start at home.

With you.

Just Posted

Rainbow crosswalk in Qualicum Beach covered in mysterious black substance

‘It was disappointing to see this act of disrespect take place inside our community’

Oceanside RCMP hunt for man after pair of indecent exposure incidents

Elderly woman grabbed by man who had been masturbating in the woods

Nanoose Bay traffic update: paving postponed but closure extended on Northwest Bay Road

Mainroad Contracting halts paving while City of Parksville waits on contractors

Group aims to preserve French Creek tree

Save Estuary Land Society says bald eagles used tree for nest

VIDEO: Title of 25th Bond movie is ‘No Time to Die’

The film is set to be released in April 2020

Warrant issued for man who wielded machete near Nanaimo’s tent city last year

William Robert Francis Carrigan failed to appear in provincial court in Nanaimo on Tuesday

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

B.C. seniors allowed more choice to stay in assisted living

Province doesn’t need to wait for a complaint to investigate care, Adrian Dix says

Retired B.C. fisherman wins record $60M Lotto Max jackpot

Joseph Katalinic won the biggest Lotto Max prize ever awarded

Island manslaughter suspect found not guilty in Supreme Court

Court accepts accused’s argument of self-defence for 2017 incident in Courtenay

Most Read