The majority of cannabis users smoke the drug, as opposed to eating or vaping it, a Statistics Canada survey has found. (Darryl Dyck /The Canadian Press)

25% of Canadians still won’t say they use pot, survey says

Statistics Canada poll says Canadians on average were 18.9 years old when they first tried pot.

A quarter of Canadians aren’t any more likely to admit to using cannabis today, even though the drug is now legal, a survey from Statistics Canada suggests.

The data, released this week, was part of a large-scale, $220,000 research project into Canadians’ attitudes about and use of pot prior to legalization.

Of the 13,000 people surveyed, 31 per cent said they were more willing to disclose their cannabis use after Oct. 17, while 24 per cent said they were already open about it.

But 24.9 per cent say they still won’t admit to consuming marijuana, no matter what the laws say.

READ MORE: The latest advent calendar trend: Holiday cannabis

Canadians on average were 18.9 years old when they first tried pot. 

The highest average age was on Prince Edward Island at 19.5 years and the lowest was in the Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories at 17.2.

In B.C., the average age was 18.5 years old. In Alberta, it was 19.

Researchers found that 18.6 per cent of Canadians used pot daily, a figure that trended up to nearly 21 per cent for men aged 20 to 24.

READ MORE: One month after legalization, illicit cannabis shops doing brisk business

A quarter of Canadians used cannabis at least five times each week, with the highest numbers in Newfoundland and Labrador at 30.5 per cent and Ontario at 25.9 per cent.

In B.C. and Alberta, 23.7 and 24.7 per cent told researchers they used at least five times a week.

On those days, 40 per cent the pot users said they were “stoned” for one to two hours, while 8.4 per cent said they were stoned for upwards of seven hours.

Among Canadians who’d used pot in the past year, 89 per cent said they smoked it, 42 per cent said they had eaten it, and 26 per cent said they had vaped it.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Experiment from Ballenas students heads to International Space Station

Entries from 23 countries; Ballenas is one of 11 schools chosen in Canada

Public hearing set for affordable housing development in Parksville

Council passes two bylaws, eyes 130 Shelly Rd. as affordable housing units for families

No injuries reported in five-vehicle pileup in Nanoose Bay

Traffic slowed briefly on Monday afternoon

Christmas program creating tradition for PQB single mother and daughter

‘It just makes all the difference for your child to smile and laugh on Christmas morning’

PQB crime report: Thieves pilfer cash, root beer and hand sanitizer

Oceanside RCMP receive 249 complaints in one-week period

VIDEO: Octopus, bald eagle battle after bird ‘bites off more than it can chew’ in B.C. waters

B.C. crew films fight between the two feisty animals in Quatsino off north Vancouver Island

Process to identify those killed in Gabriola plane crash could take days

Canadian flight museum suggests Alex Bahlsen of Mill Bay died in Tuesday’s crash

Raptors fans show Kawhi the love in his return to Toronto

Leonard receives championship ring, leads new club to win

UPDATED: No survivors in Gabriola Island plane crash: RCMP

Coroner confirms multiple fatalities after small plane goes down Tuesday night near Nanaimo

One man dead after car crash in Nanaimo

One person died, another was injured in the accident which happened Wednesday on Nanaimo Lakes Road

‘Honest mistake:’ RCMP says B.C. cannabis shop can keep image of infamous Mountie

Sam Steele wearing military, not RCMP uniform in image depicted in Jimmy’s Cannabis window

B.C. conservation officers put down fawn blinded by pellet gun on Vancouver Island

Young deer found near construction site in Hammond Bay area in Nanaimo, B.C.

Laid-off forest workers converge on B.C. legislature

Loggers call for action on strike, provincial stumpage

B.C. guide fined $2K in first conviction under new federal whale protection laws

Scott Babcock found guilty of approaching a North Pacific humpback whale at less than 100 metres

Most Read