A pro-pipeline billboard up near Kelowna. (Government of Alberta)

Alberta piles on the pressure with pro-pipeline billboards across B.C.

Premier Rachel Notley says delaying Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline is hurting the economy

Have you seen the new red-and-white billboards advertising the Trans Mountain pipeline in B.C. lately?

It’s part of a new Alberta government public relations campaign meant to put pressure on the B.C. government, which has been resisting Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion for months.

The controversial project would twin an existing pipeline that extends from central Alberta to a refinery in Burnaby.

The billboards are part of Alberta’s #KeepCanadaWorking campaign launched in February and are the province’s latest retort in the ongoing battle over the pipeline.

The campaign includes the billboards and digital ads, and will soon have television and radio promos.

On Thursday, the Alberta government said B.C.’s push to nix the pipeline is costing the Canadian economy $40 million per day.

Operator Kinder Morgan, who halted all “non-essential” work on the pipeline in early April, said it will make a final investment decision on the $7.4-billion expansion on May 31.

READ MORE: B.C. seeks court ruling on new pipeline regulations

READ MORE: Burnaby asks Supreme Court of Canada to rule in Kinder Morgan case

“It is important that Canadians understand what’s at stake when we talk about the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion,” said Premier Rachel Notley.

“A lack of market access is costing Canadians good jobs. It is putting the national climate plan at risk.”

The feud between the neighbours started in January, when B.C. proposed to increase restrictions on transporting diluted bitumen by pipeline or rail until the “behaviour” of spilled bitumen can be better understood and a response plan can be made. Notley responded by temporarily banning the sale of B.C. wine.


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