The upper age limit for young adults who were formerly in care and want to apply for the provincial tuition waiver program has been raised to 27 years old. (Wikimedia Commons)

B.C. boosts support for former youth in government care

More support coming for rent, child care and health care while they go back to school

The B.C. government says it’s giving a financial break to young adults who have spent time in government care.

Those young adults will now get more support for rent, child care and health care, while they go back to school or attend a rehabilitation, vocational or approved life skills program.

READ MORE: VIU tuition waiver program targets youth in care

READ MORE: The tragic and preventable death of a teen in government care

The changes come as part of a $7.7-million expansion of the Agreements with Young Adults program and they take effect April 1.

As part of the expansion, the upper age limit for young adults who want to apply for the provincial tuition waiver program has been raised to 27 years old.

The needs-based monthly support rate has also been raised by up to $250 to a new maximum of $1,250.

The provincial government says financial support is now available year round, instead of the previous eight-month limit, so young people can continue to receive supports while on summer holiday or other program breaks.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Short list for new gnome home includes Parksville, Coombs

Five potential locations have been chosen by Howard’s owners who will decide Tuesday

Parksville’s mystery cowboy revealed

Kevin Gourlay’s horse garners attention for being ‘parked’ outside a liquor store

Qualicum man sentenced for tying up, robbing another man

Gabriel Stephen Nelson robbed and assaulted travelling businessman in 2017

Parksville man ‘parks’ horse during liquor store pit stop

As long as animal wasn’t jaywalking, no problem, says city official

After mosque attacks, New Zealand bans ‘military-style’ guns

The gunman killed 50 in a Christchurch mosque

Nowhere to grieve: How homeless people deal with loss during the opioid crisis

Abbotsford homeless advocate says grief has distinct challenges for those living on the streets

ICBC shifts to Alberta model, with higher rates, private insurers say

B.C. public insurance includes funding enforcement, driver licensing

B.C., feds accused of ‘environmental racism’ over Site C, Mount Polley

Amnesty International Canada says governments failed to recognize threats to Indigenous peoples

New Leger polls suggests federal Liberals lagging Conservatives

Overall, 31 per cent of respondents polled said they would vote for Justin Trudeau’s Liberals

Number of homeless deaths more than doubled in B.C. as opioid crisis set in

New data shows trend between more overdose deaths and the number of people dying in the street

Four people spat on in ‘random, unprovoked’ assaults: Vancouver police

Police ask additional victims to come forward after woman in a wheelchair spat on

Most Read