When it comes to Daylight Saving Time, losing an hour of sleep is the least of your worries, say some experts. (Unsplash)

B.C. MLA fights to abolish Daylight Saving Time

MLA Linda Larson says the time jumps impact British Columbians’ productivity, safety and health

As B.C. residents prepare to roll their clocks ahead this weekend, a B.C. MLA continues her dedicated fight to end Daylight Saving Time across the province.

Boundary–Similkameen MLA Linda Larson is preparing to re-introduce Bill M201 for a third time – calling on the legislature to end to the practice of changing the clock twice each year.

Daylight saving is just around the corner. Sunday, March 10 at 3 a.m. is the moment British Columbians lose an hour of sleep and “spring forward” into longer days.

RELATED: BC MLA wants to abolish Daylight Saving Time

But Larson said most of the Bill M201 supporters are happy with the “spring forward” savings and want to keep the time in that “forward” mode.

“The daylight saving time is the time people want – they want the extra daylight in the summer months,” Larson said. “People are more interested in the light in the nicer months than they are in the winter months.”

When asked how she feels about more darkness in the winter, Larson says it wouldn’t be a big change.

“Let’s face it, this is something we already deal with. It’s nothing new. I don’t believe it’s an issue.”

RELATED: Save power after Daylight Saving

Larson’s introduction of the bill came after her constituent city, Grand Forks brought forth – and passed – a motion at the Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) to end Daylight Saving Time.

She says impacts on productivity, safety and general health have been well documented.

“The necessity to do [Daylight Saving Time] is no longer there. It was done very specifically more than 100 years ago for a purpose … and we no longer need to do the switching.”

And there is support for Larson’s concerns.

Bahareh Ezzati, a respiratory therapist with CanSleep Services, says losing an hour of sleep each spring can put pressure on a person’s cardiovascular system, which can have devastating consequences for people with pre-existing heart conditions.

RELATED: Daylight savings contributes to sleep deprivation: professors

“The main thing is that you get in a routine and now that routine has changed and your body doesn’t know why it is happening,” Ezzati said. “We do adapt, but at a cost. [Recovery] takes a few days to a few weeks, and that would make people very tired and increases the risk of motor vehicle accidents.”

Larson isn’t confident that the bill will pass this year, but she doesn’t plan on giving up.

“I will put it on the table with great hope as I always do, and as the session ends it will fall off again,” she said. “At some point, I think it is something that will be dealt with, and I’m hoping there will be a government bold enough to do it.”

Just Posted

Language showcase at Qualicum Beach Museum

2019 is the year of Indigenous languages

Big Hearts to descend on the Tigh-Na-Mara Toy Drive

Annual event takes place Nov. 27 in Parksville

Man taken to hospital after driving off road in Qualicum Beach

51-year-old man from Port Alberni struck parked vehicle

B.C. politicians view supermodel’s transition journey on Transgender Day

Liberal MLA Jane Thornthwaite and New Democrat MLA Spencer Chandra Herbert appear in the documentary

1898 Yukon gold rush photo featuring Greta Thunberg look-alike sends internet into tailspin

Jokes erupted this week after a 120-year-old photo taken by Eric A. Hegg surfaced from archives

BC Ferries’ two new hybrid vessels set sail for B.C. from Romania

Two Island Class ferries to be in use by 2020

Distracted driving tickets not for ICBC revenue, B.C. minister says

Minister Mike Farnworth calls SenseBC analysis ‘nonsense’

CN Rail strike and lack of trucking alternatives stoke forest industry fears

Companies calling on the federal government to ‘do everything in its power’ to end the strike

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveils new Liberal cabinet

Pivotal role in his new cabinet for a minority-government era goes to Chrystia Freeland

B.C. mom, kids on bike turned away from Tim Hortons drive-thru

Car-free for years, Charity Millar ‘felt gross’ being denied service

B.C. woman puts call out for 10,000 personal, heartfelt Christmas cards for the homeless

Christmas Card Collective enters into third year of making spirits bright

No turn signals, double-parking among top concerns for B.C. drivers: poll

Two-thirds of B.C. drivers said that not using turn signals was their biggest pet peeve

Most Read