Whether or not the rezoning for 222 Corfield (where is supportive housing facility is planned) will stand is the subject of a lawsuit, and BC Housing is hoping to become a defendant in the lawsuit along with the City of Parksville. — Adam Kveton Photo

Whether or not the rezoning for 222 Corfield (where is supportive housing facility is planned) will stand is the subject of a lawsuit, and BC Housing is hoping to become a defendant in the lawsuit along with the City of Parksville. — Adam Kveton Photo

BC Housing wants to intervene in Parksville supportive housing project lawsuit

Agency applies to become defendant alongside city over 222 Corfield rezoning

New Parksville Mayor Ed Mayne says the only way a supportive housing project at 222 Corfield St. South might be stopped is through a pending lawsuit — one which may see another defendant: BC Housing.

The agency filed an application on Nov. 2 to become a “respondent,” alongside the City of Parksville, in response to the petition by Ron Chiovetti, Adam Fras and others. BC Housing said confirmed Nov. 22 that it has applied to be a defendant in the case.

The petition, filed Aug. 3, calls for the the city’s zoning bylaw for the supportive housing site to be “quashed” based on alleged issues with the rezoning process.

The application from BC Housing and the Provincial Rental Housing Corporation reads that the agencies should be respondents due to their “direct involvement” in the project, as the entity funding and managing the project, and the registered lease holder on the 222 Corfield Lands.

“This project will be providing 52 new homes, as well as a cold weather shelter, for people who are already living in Parksville and are experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including seniors and people with disabilities,” reads an emailed response to the NEWS from BC Housing.

“These homes are much needed and will provide vital 24/7 supportive services, which includes access to mental health and addiction programs, as well as employment and life skills training to help tenants move forward with their lives. We are working to ensure that we can move forward with the project.”

The petition against the rezoning for the supportive housing location, made on behalf of petitioners Chiovetti, Fras, Doug O’Brien, Melanie Van Der Stock and Berwick Retirement Communities Ltd., alleges that the city failed to provide notice of the amending bylaw and a public hearing on the matter in several instances, that former Parksville Mayor Marc Lefebvre told Chiovetti the city would push through the bylaw regardless of public opinion, that the public hearing was conducted unfairly and that several of the petitioners were denied the opportunity to speak at the public hearing, among other allegations.

The city’s response denies these allegations, saying Chiovetti must have misinterpreted Lefebvre, that the city did its due diligence in informing the public, and that petitioners were only denied the opportunity to speak when their comments were outside the purview of the public hearing.

It also sought to explain several of Lefebvre and the city’s rules regarding conduct at the meeting, made in an effort (it said) to allow as many people to speak as possible, and to keep comments related to the zoning bylaw itself.

The supportive housing project was a major issue in the Oct. 20 municipal election, which saw Fras and O’Brien elected to Parksville council.

Mayne has previously said Lefebvre was “unable to conduct a proper public hearing (on Corfield rezoning) and completely destroyed the democratic process.”

He has, however, declared a conflict of interest with regards to the project as he owns property immediately adjacent to the 222 Corfield site.

“The only way to stop this (project) will be by the courts ruling in favour of the plaintiffs,” said Mayne in an email. “Hopefully, one way or another this issue gets put behind us soon so we can get on with other important matters.”

Mayne said he believes a date of Dec. 17 has been set for the court to hear the petition.

NOTE: This story has been corrected to indicate BC Housing has applied to be named as a defendant in the case.

Just Posted

Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lotto Max jackpot goes unclaimed again

42 of the 64 Maxmillion prizes of $1 million were won, the majority were sold in Ontario

A slide on best practices when reporting a suspected impaired driver that was presented to Parksville city council on June 7 by Margarita Bernard, a volunteer with MADD. The organization’s Report Impaired Drivers campaign involves the installation of informative signs within the City of Parksville. (Mandy Moraes photo)
MADD brings campaign to report impaired drivers to Parksville

Aim is to raise awareness that 911 should be called

Pam Bottomley (executive director), right and Sandy Hurley (president) of the Parksville Downtown Business Association visit the PQB News/VI Free Daily studio. (Peter McCully photo)
PQBeat: Downtown Parksville gears up for post-pandemic bounce back

Podcast: Hurley, Bottomley chat about what’s ahead for the PDBA

(Black Press file photo)
RCMP: Air ambulance called to Whiskey Creek after crash involving 2 motorbikes

Both riders taken to hospital with serious injuries

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., on April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Labour shortages, closed borders major obstacles to B.C. restaurant, tourism restarts

Industry expert says it won’t start to recover until international travellers can visit

A still image from security camera video recorded June 8 shows an individual lighting trash on fire in the doorway of 19+ Cannabis Store on Victoria Crescent. RCMP and Nanaimo Fire Rescue are investigating numerous fires set in downtown Nanaimo in the past three months. (Photo submitted)
‘It’s out of control’: More than 20 fires set in downtown Nanaimo in past 3 months

Authorities asking business owners to keep dumpsters locked

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Janet Mort

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

The B.C. government’s vaccine booking website is busy processing second-dose appointments, with more than 76 per cent of adults having received a first dose. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations stable for Tuesday

108 new confirmed cases, 139 in hospital, 39 in intensive care

Most Read