Catspan volunteers believe it’s time to move this colony of about 30 cats living on private property in Nanoose Bay.

Cat colony in Nanoose Bay has got to go

Catspan looking for help in dealing with this 30-cat colony on private property

atspan is looking for the public’s help as it deals with a colony of 30 feral cats on private property in Nanoose Bay.

Efforts by the group have reduced the long-standing colony from a high of 80 cats a couple of years ago, but Catspan volunteers believe it’s time to deal with this situation once and for all.

“We really feel the cats have to be moved,” said Catspan director Barbara Seeley. “There are a lot of neighbours who are really supportive, but there are some neighbours who would sooner see the cats move on.”

“(The people of this region) are pretty good at helping each other out and we need some help from the community.”

Moving this amount of cats is a laborious and expensive proposition, said Seeley. Each cat needs to be trapped individually, taken to the vet for a check-up/shots/spay-neuter and then, it is hoped, matched with a good home. She said the whole process, even with the help (discounts) of Parksville Animal Hospital and not counting the amount of time and effort put in by volunteers, could cost $3,000, or $100/cat.

Seeley said the owner of the property in Nanoose Bay has been in hospital and no-one has resided at the site for a couple of years. She said Catspan had permission from the owner to go on the land and feed the cats, which it has been doing now for years.

“This has been an intense and emotional issue for CatSpan volunteers, who have helped these cats for years,” Seeley said. “Relocating such a colony is inherently risky, but we have no choice. These cats need a home. Ideally a rural property or properties, away from highways and dogs. Perhaps a hobby farm, or a small portion of land in a discreet area. Most of these cats are eight-10 years old, and deserve to spend the remainder of their lives in safety.”

If you would like to help Catspan, with your time or money, here’s the contact info: CatSpan, PO Box 64, Nanoose Bay, B.C., V9P 9J9. Phone: 250-821-1867 or e-mail: nanoosecatspan@gmail.com. You can find more information about feral cats at: www.catspanferals.com.

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