Qualicum Beach’s mayor-elect Brian Wiese is congratulated at a party at the Qualicum Beach Inn after the votes were in on Saturday, Oct. 20. — Adam Kveton Photo

Qualicum Beach’s mayor-elect Brian Wiese is congratulated at a party at the Qualicum Beach Inn after the votes were in on Saturday, Oct. 20. — Adam Kveton Photo

Mayne elected mayor in Parksville; Wiese tops polls in Qualicum Beach

New leaders elected in each community

For the first time in nearly two decades, Parksville and Qualicum Beach will each have a new mayor at the same time.

Ed Mayne is the new mayor in Parksville, following voting in Saturday’s municipal elections.

He earned 2,567 votes, defeating former councillor Kirk Oates who garnered 1,518 votes and third-place Chris Long, who got 219 votes.

This will be Mayne’s second stint as Parksville mayor, having served from 2008 to 2010 and then ran for the leadership of the B.C. Liberal Party.

“It’s going to be interesting that’s for sure,” Mayne said of his return.

Mayne said the first thing he would do is get to know the councillors that he will be working with.

“To get to understand who wants to do what and what liaisons they wish to have and then from there the first thing I want to start organizing is the mayor’s roundtable that I promised.”

The Parksville councillors are: Adam Fras (2,879 votes), Teresa Patterson (2,508), Al Greir (2,486), Doug O’Brien (2,357), Mark Chandler (2,343) and Marilyn Wilson (2,070).

Mayne’s main reason to run for mayor again due to his concern about divisiveness within the city stemming from the 222 Corfield housing issue, which he intends to seriously sort out.

“It’s dividing the community and we will find out where that’s going to go in the next couple of weeks,” said Mayne.

Before Mayne came to Vancouver Island, Mayne was a senior vice president with Tim Hortons. He now operates a Tim Hortons franchise in Parksville and Nanaimo with wife Lillian. Mayne is also a senior associate at Mayne Burger and Associates.

RELATED: Three questions for mayoral candidate Ed Mayne

In Qualicum Beach, the new mayor is former Calgary deputy fire chief Brian Wiese.

He defeated Anne Skipsey, with Wiese receiving 2,581 votes and Skipsey receiving 1,987.

Comprising the new Qualicum Beach council are Adam Walker (2,893 votes), Robert Filmer (2,380), Teunis Westbroek (2,376) and Scott Harrison (1,990).

“I feel really, really, really good,” said Wiese at a celebration at the Qualicum Beach Inn, one of several places he planned to stop by.

“I can’t say enough about all the people that got me here. Like all the volunteer s and the campaign managers, and how the town actually revolved around the idea that change is a good thing. You know, minor changes.

“We need to bring in doctors, we need affordable living for our older folks and we need it for our younger folks, and tonight is all about the celebration, and tomorrow we’re going to get to work.”

Though, he noted that, “I think my first priority always was getting a council that would work together, and I think we did that today.”

Of outgoing and unsuccessful candidates, Wiese had this to say: “I just want to say a quick thank-you to all the candidates that ran, Anne and Barry and all the rest of them put up a great campaign. They’ve done their service, and my congratulations to them for what they have done, but Qualicum Beach is moving forward and I’m really happy to be at the helm.”

Wiese holds a Masters Certificate in Project Management and a Professional Management Certificate from York University in Toronto.

He worked as a deputy chief in the Calgary Fire Department, managing a multimillion-dollar annual budget.

Upon arriving in Qualicum Beach, he worked as an office manager for a real estate company for a year.

Previously, Wiese said his approach would be to follow in the footsteps of the founders of this community, keeping with the tradition of cautious high-quality development, particularly with projects like the downtown bus garage and the waterfront.

During his campaign, he also stressed the need for teamwork. “I believe I can help get Qualicum staff, citizens and volunteers pulling more in the same direction.”

In a previous question-and-answer article with The NEWS, Wiese called “working together to solve the challenges facing us” the most pressing election issue. “We need to set aside differences, stope bickering and start working together to protect and enhance our quality of life.”

He noted health care and affordable housing as being major issues.

In the Regional District of Nanaimo, in Electoral Area E Bob Rogers won by acclamation. Leanne Salter is the new Area F director with 638 votes, while in Electoral Area G it was a close race with Clarke Gourlay winning by 24 votes over Lehann Wallace. In Electoral Area H, Stuart McLean with 935 votes beat RDN chair Bill Veenhof.

In the Qualicum School District, Even Flynn (Area E), Julie Austin (Area F), Laura Godfrey and R. Elaine Young (Area G), and Barry Kurland (Area H) were installed by acclamation, with Laura Godfrey being the only new trustee, taking the place of Jacob Gair.

Check back with www.pqbnews.com for extended coverage in the aftermath of the election.

MUNICIPAL ELECTION 2018 RESULTS
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Parksville’s new mayor Ed Mayne congratulates new councillor Adam Fras. — Michael Briones photo

Parksville’s new mayor Ed Mayne congratulates new councillor Adam Fras. — Michael Briones photo

Parksville’s new mayor Ed Mayne (middle) meets the new city councillors Adam Fras, Teresa Patterson, Al Greir, Doug O’Brien, Mark Chandler and Marilyn Wilson. — Michael Briones photo

Parksville’s new mayor Ed Mayne (middle) meets the new city councillors Adam Fras, Teresa Patterson, Al Greir, Doug O’Brien, Mark Chandler and Marilyn Wilson. — Michael Briones photo

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