Parents warned of grad party dangers

Average of four B.C. teens die in vehicle incidents each grad season, with another 1,140 injured

Police officer removes open liquor from a vehicle at a roadside check.

The B.C. government is sticking to education to keep grad parties safe this spring, rather than increasing penalties for “party bus” companies.

Officials are more concerned about under-aged drinking at house parties and bush parties than alcohol served in limousines and buses that have become a popular way for young people to go out on the town.

Transportation Minister Todd Stone said party bus operators have been reminded that no open liquor is allowed in any vehicle, and inspections will continue with violators risking loss of their licences. Party bus operators have changed their websites and advertising to emphasize that no drinking is allowed on board.

At a graduation safety event in Victoria, RCMP and ICBC representatives stressed that there are grad-related fatalities every spring, and the problem extends to adult-sanctioned parties.

Inspector Ted Emanuels, officer in charge of the B.C. RCMP’s enhanced traffic services, said any event or transportation where alcohol is served to minors is not a safe grad.

“The misuse and abuse of drugs and alcohol are the underlying factor in grad events where the police get involved, including physical assault, sexual assault, fights and accidental injuries,” Emanuel said. “We know from experience that bad things happen to good kids in these environments. There are also criminal and civil liabilities that you need to be aware of.”

On average, there are four teens killed in graduation-related vehicle incidents each year in B.C., with another 1,140 injured.

Jill Blacklock, ICBC’s road safety manager, said parents need to discuss transportation plans with teens before every event they go to, giving them more than one option. Programming taxi numbers into their phones and checking transit schedules before they go out are recommended.

After grad is over, the summer ahead is a time of parties that need the same kind of planning, Blacklock said.

Emanuels said one of the most difficult jobs in policing is knocking on somebody’s door in the middle of the night to report a fatality.

“Answering that door is worse,” he said. “Our objective is that your kids wake you up at four in the morning and not us.”

 

Just Posted

$3.5M all-season turf field planned for Qualicum Beach

Town seeks grant for community playing surface upgrades

Car theft suspect arrested in Coombs

Vehicle and two motorcyles recovered on Jan. 16

Qualicum Beach council big on support for multi-use cinema proposal

Society asks for 10,000 square feet, gets recommendation to consider with strategic plan

Lincoln stolen from Parksville dealership found near Duncan

Vehicle was located three days later with minor damage

Ballenas student experiment going into space

Science experiment designed by five SD69 students will travel to International Space Station

B.C. opioid crisis to get same world-renowned treatment approach as HIV/AIDS

A program that focuses on treatment as prevention will roll out Jan. 17

Netflix rejects request to remove Lac-Megantic images from ‘Bird Box’

At least two shows on Netflix’s Canadian platform briefly use actual footage of the 2013 tragedy

FOCUS: Canada’s revamped impaired driving law brews ‘potential for injustice’

There must be ‘trigger’ for cops to come knocking, Surrey MP says

Barack Obama to speak at Vancouver event

Former U.S. president will speak with board of trade in March

Former welfare clients still owed money, B.C. Ombudsperson says

Investigation found 2,600 people docked illegally for earning income

Prince George could get province’s second BC Cannabis Store

The first brick-and-mortar government retail location opened in Kamloops on Oct. 17

B.C. chowdery caught up in ‘rat-in-soup’ scandal to close

Crab Park Chowdery will be shutting down Jan. 20

Teen vaping is an epidemic: US government

E-cigarettes are now the top high-risk substance used by teenagers, outpacing cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana

Vancouver councillors unanimously approve motion declaring climate emergency

Vancouver joins cities like Los Angeles and London

Most Read