Sam David of the Parksville Qualicum District 4-H poultry club sports a pair of unusual birds during a club event this year. The local 4-H club is seeking adult volunteers for 2017.

Parksville Qualicum Beach 4-H club needs volunteers

And you don't have to be a farmer to be a member and help the youth of 4-H

The Parksville Qualicum District 4-H Club may see its activities curtailed in the coming year. But don’t blame the kids.

Currently on a break after wrapping up its 2016 schedule, the local club is facing a critical shortage of adult volunteers and helpers and is hoping members in the community can step up.

“We have no problem getting members; we have lots of those,” 4-H club president Joan Larson said. “What we really need are parent helpers or other adults who can step up and help the club function.”

Of particular need is an administrative volunteer to take on some of the paperwork generated by registration, scheduling and correspondence from the District 4-H Council.

“It’s a little bit of hands-on work, but not a large amount,” said Larson. “It’s usually our once-a-month club meeting and one district council meeting per month.”

The Parksville Qualicum District 4-H will gladly accept volunteers in any capacity. The organization currently has about 75-80 members, Larson said, who are involved in projects ranging from the horse, poultry, beef, odd stock and dog clubs, to photography and art clubs, and more.

The local club is a member of 4-H British Columbia, which in turn is part of a larger, international organization dedicated to preparing young people for their future roles as adult citizens. In addition to their specific project areas, which can range from raising farm animals to small-engine repair, sewing and fibre crafts, photography and art, members are also eligible for scholarships, school credits, education boards, demonstrations and seminars.

“You don’t have to live on a farm to be a member,” said Larson. “And you don’t have to have kids in 4-H to be a volunteer. We have a person who was never in 4-H, who doesn’t have kids, and she runs our dog club.”

The youths also elect their own 4-H member council, and project leaders are selected to head the various groups.

Prospective members must be at least nine years old as of Jan. 1 to be registered. The Clover Buds program offers crafts and other activities to youngsters from 6-9 years of age, “if we can find a leader,” said Larson.

Plans for the coming year include a Parksville Qualicum District 4-H gardening club. Garden spaces have already been provided in Parksville, Qualicum Beach and Coombs, and 4-H has teamed with the Coombs Farmers’ Institute in applying for a grant that would fund a co-ordinator.

“All we need is a leader to oversee the kids,” said Larson.

For more information or to sign up as a volunteer, contact Larson at 250-752-0395 or joan@joanlarson.com.

Just Posted

Woodyatt seeks help to pursue physics education in London

Kwalikum Secondary product gets accepted to prestigious university in United Kingdom

Nanoose Bay Catspan receives BC SPCA funding

Spay/neuter grant to address overpopulation

Solar system spending, asbestos removal in SD69 plan

Green house gas emission report received at May 22 board meeting

Gr. 7s learn about digital safety, health, consent at con in Parksville

SD69 hosts first Health and Wellness Conference for students headed to high school

Qualicum Beach east village plans take shape

Staff moving forward with east village concept

Trans Mountain pipeline: Is it worth the risk?

Concerns range from the threat of an oil spill to the impact of tanker traffic on wildlife

Federal leaders trade barbs about India trip at press gallery dinner

Justin Trudeau’s infamous trip to India earlier this year was the focus of many of the jabs

B.C. VIEWS: Our poverty reduction plan is already in place

NDP has another promise it needs to appear to keep

WestJet pilot strike averted as parties agree to mediation

Pilots had warned they could go on strike starting May 19

Out of control wildfire prompts restriction around Allie Lake

One of the first large wildfires of the 2018 season is blazing out of control

Passersby help rescue occupants of home as fire breaks out in Courtenay

Coffee run turns into fire rescue for pair of men

Giant beer tanks arrive in new B.C. home city

Molson Coors tanks finish river journey and move to overland trip in Chilliwack

Most Read