Parksville residents can expect a four per cent increase in property taxes in each of the next five years

City council gave three readings Monday night to the 2017-21 financial plan

Parksville property owners face a four per cent tax increase in each of the next five years if a financial plan given three readings by city council on Monday gets final approval early next year.

Increases in staff numbers in 2017 alone will cost the city more than $200,000. That includes the hiring of a human resources advisor ($90,000) and staff for emergency preparedness and administration help ($113,00 in total for both).

The city will bring in about $17 million in revenue in 2017, of which more than $13 million comes from property taxes. In 2017, the city plans to spend about $16.6 of that revenue.

The financial plan passed unanimously by council Monday night suggests the city will see revenues of $21.8 million in 2021, with $16.3 million of that coming from property taxes.

City council hosted a number of open budget meetings in the last couple of months where members of the public made their suggestions and expressed concerns.

The numbers cited above are related to the city’s general revenue fund. The water and sewer funds are separate, as are capital budgets.

One member of the public took to the microphone Monday night, asking council to consider pumping more money into the parks department budget.

Former Parksville Downtown Business Association president Marilyn Hahn suggested the city add two staff members to the parks department, just to maintain what the community already has. She said the current staff works hard, especially in Community Park, but can’t keep up with all the work that’s required elsewhere in the city.

“The parks department should have a bigger budget and larger staff,” said Hahn.

Hahn pointed to the condition of roadside beds in the city this year. “This summer I was totally embarrassed by them,” she said.

City council still has an opportunity to make changes to the 2017 budget and 2017-21 financial plan before it becomes official early next year, but the three readings passed on Monday allows the city to move forward on some of the budget items that need attention before that final approval.

Just Posted

Development, taxes and 222 Corfield discussed at Parksville all candidates meeting

All candidates met on Oct. 11 to answer the public’s questions before the Oct. 20 election

Qualicum district students to develop experiments that could head into space

Youngsters compete to have designs reach International Space Station

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Qualicum Beach moves on grant for Eaglecrest roundabout

Council votes unanimously to have staff push for application

Dying motorcyclist from Coombs gets last-ride tribute

Friends grant Corinna Pitney’s wish ‘to hear bikes roar, to see leather and chrome’

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Fall-ing for unseasonably warm weather on Vancouver Island

Environment Canada forecast calls for sunshine through weekend

Toronto Police ID B.C. man as naked shark tank jumper

David Weaver, of Nelson, is wanted on mischief and assault charges

In Florida, families seeking the missing amid storm damage

Five days after the hurricane slammed into the Florida Panhandle, people are struggling to locate friends and loved ones.

Prince Harry and Meghan start Aussie tour with baby gifts

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on a 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific.

EU’s Barnier hopes Brexit deal possible in ‘coming weeks’

Britain is set to leave the European Union in March, but a Brexit agreement must be sealed in coming weeks to leave enough time for relevant parliaments to ratify it.

Earth samples show dust from B.C. pipeline blast not a health threat: Enbridge

Enbridge says earth sampling shows mineral and metal composition is well below provincial and federal standards for urban and residential areas.

Postal services ready for looming wave of legal cannabis deliveries

Legal cannabis is set to usher in a wave of high-value, age-restricted parcels in the mail system, and delivery companies say they’re ready.

Mega Millions prize of $654M is nation’s 4th-largest

No one has won the U.S. jackpot in almost three months

Most Read