Privacy watchdogs say B.C.-based firm broke rules for political ads on Facebook

AggregateIQ provides election-related software and political advertising

An investigation by two Canadian privacy commissioners found that a Victoria-based firm broke privacy laws when it used and disclosed personal information in the province, the United States and the United Kingdom.

A joint report by the federal and B.C. privacy commissioners says AggregateIQ failed to ensure appropriate consent for its use and disclosure of the personal information of voters.

AggregateIQ provides election-related software and political advertising.

It has been linked to Cambridge Analytica, a now bankrupt company accused of improperly helping to crunch data for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in the United States.

Federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien and B.C. commissioner Michael McEvoy found the company leveraged a Facebook audience feature that allowed advertisers to target certain users for political advertising.

READ MORE: B.C., federal privacy watchdogs to probe possible privacy breaches at Aggregate IQ, Facebook

Their joint report says AggregateIQ did not appropriately verify consent and individuals wouldn’t have expected their personal information to be disclosed to Facebook or that it would have been used for the purpose of political advertising.

The commissioners recommend, and AggregateIQ agreed, to implement measures to ensure it obtains valid consent in the future and that it delete all personal information that is no longer needed for legal or business purposes.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Body discovered floating in water near Lasqueti Island

JRCC reports fishing vessel personnel made the find on Saturday, Sept. 19

PQBeat: Do you remember your first television set?

Sharing memories of TV shows past and present

COVID-19: New air carrier sought for Qualicum Beach Airport

Island Express Air ends operation due to pandemic

B.C. or Ontario? Residential school survivors fight move of court battle

It’s now up to Ontario’s Court of Appeal to sort out the venue question

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

Resident Alien returns to Ladysmith for filming in early October

New SyFy series back after spring filming interrupted by COVID-19

COVID-19 skill loss will hurt global economic output for rest of century: survey

About one in seven Canadian students satisfied with transition toward online learning

Most Read