Human dignicide

The human species has survived for about two million years and the average life expectancy has increased from 35 years, to 80 years.

In reference to the end of life discussion; people should have the choice and right to die with dignity, and we need new terminology to describe this end of life process. The human species has survived on this planet for about two million years and the average life expectancy has gradually increased from about 35 years, to between 60 and 80 years.

Death is a certainty for all living things; although in our culture, the end of life is not easily accepted.

Human life is often prolonged against the wishes of the individual, even if it causes pain, suffering, humiliation and loss of dignity. The question is, do individuals have the fundamental ‘right to die’ in peace, where and when they chose? The more appropriate question is: should any authority have the right to prevent a person from making this very personal decision.

The term ‘dignicide’ should be used to express a pre-planned dignified death initiated by a person in a sound mental condition. A dignicist is appropriate to describe an individual practising the discipline of dignicide. The role of the dignicist would be to administer the appropriate procedure to end the life of the individual with dignity, without pain or humiliation. Find more at www.innovationbc.com/dignicide.html.

More than seven billion people are currently on the journey of life; if they had a choice, how would they prefer to die? The end of one’s life should not be seen as a sad and painful loss, moreover, reaching a reasonable age and having lived a useful and fulfilling life, should be seen as a great accomplishment.

Planning for the future should include the option to end one’s life in a peaceful and respectful way.

Trevor WicksQualicum Beach

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