LETTER: Monarch remains protector of Canadian Constitution

LETTER: Monarch remains protector of Canadian Constitution

In your editorial about historic events (35 years… and counting, The NEWS, Oct.10) there is an inaccuracy which I believe should be corrected.

You stated that The Canada Act of 1982 allowed the government to amend our Constitution without the approval of The Queen. Canada was granted independence by the United Kingdom in 1867 but our federal and provincial governments could never agree on a way to amend the Constitution. So amendments had to be passed by the U.K. Parliament until we finally, through The Canada Act of 1982, agreed on a formula.

As a constitutional monarch, the Queen or her Governor-General agreed to this act, as she does with all acts of both the U.K. and Canadian parliaments legally passed, as the ultimate protector of our constitution. This role continues to this day.

That is why this system of government works so well, as it prevents abuse of power so often seen in republics. The Canada Act also entrenched the Monarchy in our Canadian Constitution by the agreement of the federal and provincial governments, which makes any attempt at abolition of this longstanding institution very difficult.

Thomas A. Malcolm Wardle

Parksville