Merv was a true forester’s hero

Champion of sustainable logging will be missed

I first met Merv Wilkinson when I was recreation officer for the Ministry of Forests in Duncan in the mid 1980s.

I was particularly taken with his ideas of sustainability and that selective logging could take place without disrupting wildlife or the recreating public.

His woodland was always open to the public for wildlife viewing, bird watching, wildflower viewing and just for a quiet walk to enjoy the wonders of nature.

Wildwood has been an outdoor classroom, studied and used by schools and universities for many years.

His views are so logical, sensible and environmentally friendly, with both short term and long term economics very much a driving factor. British Columbian jobs were very important in his management style.

He could not understand why our government is so determined to destroy the forest ecosystem while shipping the jobs offshore.

His inspiration was the basis for the Duncan Forest District doing some very innovative (considered experimental at that time) Small Business Timber Sales in the Currie Creek area.

Some were small patch cuts with special consideration for bats; bears, woodpeckers, voles and many other creatures. Some timber sales were selective logging — restricted to horses only for skidding.

One of the many impressive things I remember is Merv expounding on the value of woodpeckers, wasps and ants in the ecosystem of the forest.

I retired from the Ministry of Forests in 2000 and my wife Ronda and I started an eco-tour company.  We have done many tours to Wildwood Forest.

Merv always welcomed our group into his home to talk about his beloved Wildwood and the merits of sustainable logging.

We have talked to him many times and he always had a new and interesting story about one of his experiences around the world or right here at home promoting sustainable forestry.

His knowledge and recall ability of nearly a century of history was astounding.

I will miss Merv deeply. I will miss those fascinating and inspiring talks as will hundreds of people that have spoken with Merv.

He will live on in his video on our website and in the hearts of many people.

Goodbye my hero.

I pledge to do my best in passing on your message.

Gary Murdock, forest

technologist (retired)

Pacific Rainforest Adventure Tours

 

Parksville

 

 

I first met Merv Wilkinson when I was recreation officer for the Ministry of Forests in Duncan in the mid 1980s.

I was particularly taken with his ideas of sustainability and that selective logging could take place without disrupting wildlife or the recreating public.

His woodland was always open to the public for wildlife viewing, bird watching, wildflower viewing and just for a quiet walk to enjoy the wonders of nature.

Wildwood has been an outdoor classroom, studied and used by schools and universities for many years.

His views are so logical, sensible and environmentally friendly, with both short term and long term economics very much a driving factor. British Columbian jobs were very important in his management style.

He could not understand why our government is so determined to destroy the forest ecosystem while shipping the jobs offshore.

His inspiration was the basis for the Duncan Forest District doing some very innovative (considered experimental at that time) Small Business Timber Sales in the Currie Creek area.

Some were small patch cuts with special consideration for bats; bears, woodpeckers, voles and many other creatures. Some timber sales were selective logging — restricted to horses only for skidding.

One of the many impressive things I remember is Merv expounding on the value of woodpeckers, wasps and ants in the ecosystem of the forest.

I retired from the Ministry of Forests in 2000 and my wife Ronda and I started an eco-tour company.  We have done many tours to Wildwood Forest.

Merv always welcomed our group into his home to talk about his beloved Wildwood and the merits of sustainable logging.

We have talked to him many times and he always had a new and interesting story about one of his experiences around the world or right here at home promoting sustainable forestry.

His knowledge and recall ability of nearly a century of history was astounding.

I will miss Merv deeply. I will miss those fascinating and inspiring talks as will hundreds of people that have spoken with Merv.

He will live on in his video on our website and in the hearts of many people.

Goodbye my hero.

I pledge to do my best in passing on your message.

Gary Murdock, forest

technologist (retired)

Pacific Rainforest Adventure Tours

 

Parksville

 

 

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