Voting for privilege?

The record of the government in power has resulted in more than 60 per cent calling for change

The world is at a difficult time. Most Canadians have simple wants: a just society where their families can enjoy housing, healthy food, safety and a government that respects them, a democracy that puts their needs before those of the large corporations that threaten to take their wealth elsewhere if their demands are not met.

The record of the government in power has resulted in more than 60 per cent calling for change, if you believe recent polls. We were warned several years ago when Prime Minister Stephen Harper spent a billion dollars to host the G20  meeting in Toronto.

A large number of people were staging a peaceful protest when things got violent with rocks and bottles being hurled. A young friend of mine who was making a video went to the back of the line where he recorded men with hoods and batons beating up the protesters.

These were policemen trying to justify their presence by making the protesters appear violent. His video was later used to expose this rouse. The officer in charge was found guilty and jailed. The young man is now seeking election in Nanaimo.

The Conservatives brag about balancing the budget. This is easy to do when you lay off personnel, drop scientists and programs and cut services to vets, all of which I believe the Conservatives have done in their time in office.

When I look at the blue signs on lawns I ask: are these people who are active in their communities to help the middle or lower income Canadians or do they seek to retain a position of privilege and power…?

Art SkipseyQualicum Beach