Wi-Fi is dangerous

In his letter to the editor, Jeffrey Peters implies that non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) is not dangerous.

Re: the letter ‘Wi-Fi Not Dangerous’ by Jeffrey Peters (The NEWS, July 1).

Peters implies that non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) is not dangerous.

Not just radio waves but microwaves are used by the communications industry. Certain microwaves cook food without ionizing it, by stimulating vibration in water molecules and other compounds. Not all cellular damage is done by ionizing radiation.

He implies that one light bulb is not dangerous because of the non-ionizing frequencies emitted. How about a hundred light bulbs in one room? That would be an increase in flux, or the amount of EMR, not an increase in frequency, or the energy of EMR — but it would still be uncomfortable.

As more cell towers go up, as more hot spots appear in libraries, hospitals and schools, we are bathed in an increasing EMR flux. These artificial EMR sources transmit 24 hours a day and are known to interfere with the brain’s night-time melatonin production, resulting in increased susceptibility to diseases.

He states that no one can detect whether or not they are in a Wi-Fi environment, and implies that this inability means that Wi-Fi isn’t harmful. Would Peters be able to detect small amounts of asbestos in his home or a small amount of DDT in his water? Both are categorized carcinogenic as is the EMR emitted by cell towers, Wi-Fi and smart meters — these findings come from the World Health Organization after considering reports from hundreds of renowned world scientists, some of them Nobel prize winners.

Perhaps Peters would like to advise these scientists to “read up on an issue before rallying against it,” the same advice he offered to all of us.

Uwe and Heather Eisenhut

Qualicum Beach

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